• What is this course?
    This lecture explains in details the objectives and expectations of the course.
    [slides] [handouts]
  • Why study this course?
    In the not too distant past, all electronics well analog. Over the past couple decades, however, analog circuitry has given way to the more verstile and easy to design digital electronic. The rise of digital electronics has many pundits predicting a sudden death of analog electronics. Furtunately, as this lecture will show, analog electronics is here to stay.
    [slides] [handout]
  • Introduction to electrical signal?
    Signal contain information about a variety of things and activities in our physical world. This lecture introduces how and why electrical signals needs processing before they can be used, review signal representation and introduces how analog signals are converted into digital signals.
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested Readings:

  • Signal amplification
    This lecture introduces the most fundamental signal-processing function, one that is employed in some form in almost every electronic system, namely, signal amplification.
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested Readings:

    • Read sections 1.4
    • Read the summary on page 44
    • Understand examples 1.2 on page 20
    • Understand examples 1.3 on page 25
    • Do exercises 1.39 and 1.40, on page 50
    • Read the wikipedia article on amplifiers
  • Circuit models for amplifiers
    Amplifier circuit vary in complexity, some with dozens of discrete components. In order to be able to apply the resulting amplifier circuit as a building block in a system, one must be able to characterize, or model, its terminal behavior. This lecturer teaches amplifier models that can be applied irrespective of the complexity of the internal circuit of the amplifier. The values of the model parameters can be found either by analyzing the amplifier circuit or by performing measurements at the amplifier terminals.
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested Readings:

    • Read sections 1.5
    • Read the summary on page 44
    • Understand examples 1.2 on page 20
    • Understand examples 1.3 on page 25
    • Do exercises 1.43 and 1.44, on page 50
  • Ideal diode
    The simplest and most fundamental nonlinear circuit element is the diode. Just like a resistor, the diode has two terminals; but unlike the resistor, which has a linear (straight-line) relationship between the current flowing through it and the voltage appearing across it, the diode has a nonlinear i–v characteristic. This lecture is concerned with the study of diodes. In order to understand the essence of the diode function, we begin with a fictitious element, the ideal diode
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested textbook readings:

  • Terminal Characteristics of Junction Diodes
    The most common implementation of the diode utilizes a pn junction. A pn junction can conduct substantial current in the forward direction and almost no current in the reverse direction. In this section we will study the i–v characteristic of the pn junction diode in detail in order to prepare ourselves for diode circuit applications.
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested textbook readings:

  • Diode models
    The iterative diode circuit method we have seen so far is precise but time-consuming. Nevertheless, there are situations in which the effort and time required are still greater than can be justified. This lecture shows quick analysis methods that designers can use in order to evaluate various possibilities before deciding on a suitable diode circuit design.
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested textbook readings:

  • The small-signal model of a diode
    A small-signal model is an AC equivalent circuit in which the nonlinear circuit elements are replaced by linear elements whose values are given by the first-order linear approximation of their characteristic curve near the bias point. The small-signal model uses a Maclaurin series expansion around a specific operating point. Using a small-signal model helps you understand more about your circuits, but it fails when the input signal gets too large
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested textbook readings:

  • Special diode types
    In this lecture, we discuss briefly some important special types of diodes.
    [slides] [handouts] [notes]

    Suggested textbook readings:

  • Rectifier circuits
    One of the most important applications of diodes is in the design of rectifier circuits. A diode rectifier forms an essential building block of the dc power supplies required to power electronic equipment. In this lecture, we talk about application of the diode in the design of rectifier circuits, which convert ac voltages to dc as needed for powering electronic equipment.
    [slides] [handouts]
  • MOSFET structure
    In this lecture, you learn the physical structure of the MOS transistor and how it works. The lecture also explains how the voltage between two terminals of the transistor controls the current that flows through the third terminal, and gives the equations that describe these current–voltage characteristics.
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested Readings:

    • Read sections 5.1 on pages 248-264
    • Understand Figure 5.1 on page 249
    • Understand example 5.1 on page 260
    • Do exercises 5.2 and D5.3 on page 261
  • MOSFET I-V charactersitics?
    This lecture explains the current–voltage characteristic or I–V curve (current–voltage curve) of a MOSFET as a function of drain voltage with overvoltage (VGS − Vth) as a parameter
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested Readings:

    • Read sections 5.2 on pages 264-276
    • Understand exercise 5.2 on page 269
  • Finite output resistance in saturation
    In previous lectures, we assume that in saturation, the drain current is independent of vDS. In reality, the drift current increases, and the drain current increases with increasing vDS
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested Readings:

  • MOSFET Circuits at DC
    The lecture consider circuits in which only dc voltages and currents are of concern. Specifically, it presents a series steps and examples of how to analyse and design MOSFET circuits at dc
    [slides] [handouts]

    Suggested Readings:

    • Read sections 5.3 on pages 276-288
    • Understand example 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7 and 5.8